Registration

DDI works with the local government to register miners – including diggers, traders and auxiliary workers – giving them a legal status that brings them into the formal economy and provides them with protection, legitimacy and access to government support.

How it works

Registration: Using iPads, registration teams comprised of representatives from government, civil society and the private sector of both genders visit mining sites to identify artisanal miners and register them.

Community and household surveys: Using iPads, surveyors document the conditions in mining communities and interview community members about their needs.

Database: The information gathered on miners and their communities is collected into a database which will become the government’s resource for community development, revenue planning and miner assistance.

Associations: Local partners help to establish miners’ associations, through which knowledge can be shared and resources used more effectively.

Capacity-building for miners: Miners are trained and informed on topics such as cooperative governance, leadership, conflict resolution, project management and entrepreneurship.

Capacity-building for government: Local, national and provincial government agencies are involved every step of the way, which progressively builds their capacity to keep the new registration system going on their own.

Purpose of the program

Greater government oversight and organization of this economic sector will help enhance its potential and prevent exploitation. With a formal registration system in place, provincial and national governments are aware of who and where miners are, what they mine and how. This knowledge enables them to support the sector, and to plan for infrastructure and services in isolated, previously unknown communities having sprouted up around mining sites. In addition, this information helps government to improve security measures in mining communities. More information about miners and their communities also helps to organize the artisanal mining sector for a greater contribution to local and national economies.

Formalization is also beneficial to artisanal miners. Thanks to registration, they can operate legally and conduct their business without fear of coercion and deception. By joining registered associations and cooperatives, they can receive training to improve their productivity and profitability, as well as collectively plan for the development of their sector and of their communities.